Mission Statement

The mission for Transplant Views is to provide accurate information about organ transplantation and it's efficacy also to shine a spotlight on research into stem cells and regenerative medicine. Stem cell and bone marrow transplants are used to treat certain types of cancer and in other applications to regenerate or regrow bone and tissue.Stem cell treatments require donation of blood or bone marrow.

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Where Doctors Train May Affect Whether They Practice Expensive Medicine

Where Doctors Train May Affect Whether They Practice Expensive Medicine


News Picture: Where Doctors Train May Affect Whether They Practice Expensive Medicine

Latest Prevention & Wellness News

2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who were trained in high-cost areas of the United States may be more likely to practice expensive medicine, a new study suggests.
However, that effect gradually decreases over time.
Researchers from George Washington University analyzed Medicare claims data from doctors who completed their residencies between 1992 and 2010. They found that those who did their medical training in more expensive regions of the country spent an average of 29 percent more on patient care than those who did their training in less expensive regions.
"Evidence suggests that there is wide variation in Medicare spending, with higher spending associated with more inpatient-based and specialist-oriented care," study senior author Dr. Fitzhugh Mullan, professor of medicine and health policy at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington, said in a university news release. ...

Boost in Docs' Incomes Comes From More Procedures, Not More Patients

Boost in Docs' Incomes Comes From More Procedures, Not More Patients


News Picture: Boost in Docs' Incomes Comes From More Procedures, Not More Patients  2014 (HealthDay News) -- High-income doctors make more money by ordering more procedures for each patient rather than by seeing more patients, which may not be the best thing for patients, a new study suggests.
The findings from the analysis of 2012 Medicare data were "very surprising," according to the authors of the research letter published Dec. 8 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.
"Medicare spending is the biggest factor crowding out investment in all other social priorities," first author Dr. Jonathan Bergman, an assistant professor of urology and family medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, said in a university news release. He's also a urologist and bioethicist at the Veterans' Health Administration-Greater Los Angeles.
"With clinicians making more not by seeing more unique patients, but by providing more services per person, additional research needs to be done to determine if these additional services are contributing to improved quality of care," he added. ...

How Sharing Your Health Data Can Help Others

How Sharing Your Health Data Can Help Others

When you post your weight, cholesterol and a slew of other health data to some websites, you're helping your fellow patients – and yourself.
Most of us are in the midst of holiday shopping, but if you can step outside the commercial hustle, consider giving a gift that literally keeps on giving: your health data.
That’s right – your height, weight, blood pressure reading, cholesterol, pulse, sleeping habits, reactions to medications and so on. If you search for breast cancer, for example, on the website PatientsLikeMe, you can see what percentage of patients report anxiety, fatigue, depression, pain and insomnia, along with how other breast cancer patients on the site rate the perceived effectiveness and side effects of various treatments such as radiation therapy, chemotherapy, lumpectomy and mastectomy. Once you actually become a member of the site, you can enter your own specific data, such as tumor markers, CT and MRI scan results, and reactions to specific drugs, like nausea. Most people – whether they're in good health or suffer from an illness – don't think of their health data as an actual asset, but in an increasingly connected world, patients’ voices are rising up through the medical establishment. ... 

Memory Lapses May Signal Stroke Risk: Study

Memory Lapses May Signal Stroke Risk: Study

Dec. 11, 2014 (HealthDay) -- Memory lapses in people with higher levels of education may be associated with increased stroke risk, researchers report.
The research included more than 9,100 people in the Netherlands, aged 55 and older, taking part in a long-term study. During the study, more than 1,100 of the participants suffered a stroke.

Overall, memory problems were independently associated with a higher risk of stroke. The researchers also found that people with memory problems had a 39 percent higher risk of stroke if they also had a higher level of education. However, the study did not prove a cause-and-effect link ...

Tamoxifen reduces breast cancer rates by nearly a third for 20 years

Tamoxifen reduces breast cancer rates by nearly a third for 20 years

The preventive effect of breast cancer drug ‘tamoxifen’ remains virtually constant for at least 20 years – with rates reduced by around 30 per cent – a new analysis reveals. During the study 7,154 pre and post-menopausal women were randomized to receive either tamoxifen (20mg daily) or a matching placebo for five years. After completing treatment, the health of all participants was monitored with an average follow-up time of 16 years and maximum of 22 years. ...

Youngest bone marrow transplant patients at higher risk of cognitive decline

Youngest bone marrow transplant patients at higher risk of cognitive decline

Toddlers who undergo total body irradiation in preparation for bone marrow transplantation are at higher risk for a decline in IQ and may be candidates for stepped up interventions to preserve intellectual functioning, investigators report. The results clarify the risk of intellectual decline faced by children, teenagers and young adults following bone marrow transplantation. The procedure is used for treatment of cancer and other diseases. It involves replacing the patient's own blood-producing stem cells with those from a healthy donor.  ...